Roger Goodell takes on politics, Deflategate and rules changes

Roger Goodell had to chuckle when a Spanish-speaking reporter asked him about the NFL building its global brand, “instead of building something else.”

The end of that question was an allusion to the border wall between the United States and Mexico proposed by President Donald Trump.

Nothing out of the ordinary occurred during his meetings with teams at the 2006 NFL Scouting Combine.

“I really didn’t have any strange questions,” said Whitworth, who would become a Cincinnati Bengals second-round draft pick.

“Maybe I was just scary. I don’t really have that personality they want to mess with because I am usually so serious about stuff.”

Not everyone is so fortunate.

The 15-minute sessions are intended to help clubs get a better feel for the prospect they may be selecting. Most of them unfold without incident. But the way some squads conduct these “job interviews” leave players scratching their heads or, in extreme cases, hoping that they don’t get picked by the questioning party.

Take the case of Indianapolis Colts left tackle Anthony Castonzo while he was going through the 2011 Combine.

“One team put on lowlights of all my worst plays and basically Pittsburgh Steelers Cheap Jerseys just asked me, ‘What were you thinking on this play? What happened here?’” Castonzo recalled. “It was brutal.”

That experience was benign compared to what happened with another club.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *